Completed Extramural Projects

GENEVA
Part of the Genetics Program of GEI, GENEVA (Gene Environment Association Studies) is using rapidly evolving technologies in Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) to find genetic risk factors in common conditions, such as tooth decay, heart disease, cancer and diabetes, and assess their interplay with non-genetic risk factors.

The Human Genome Project
The Human Genome Project (HGP) was one of the great feats of exploration in history - an inward voyage of discovery rather than an outward exploration of the planet or the cosmos; an international research effort to sequence and map all of the genes - together known as the genome - of members of our species, Homo sapiens. Completed in April 2003, the HGP gave us the ability, for the first time, to read nature's complete genetic blueprint for building a human being.

International HapMap Project
The elucidation of the entire human genome made possible the effort to develop a haplotype map of the human genome. The haplotype map, or "HapMap," is a tool that allows researchers to find genes and genetic variations that affect health and disease.

The Knockout Mouse Project

The Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) was a trans-National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiative that aimed to generate a comprehensive and public resource comprised of mice containing a null mutation in every gene in the mouse genome. (See: The NIH Knockout Mouse Project Web Site [nih.gov])

modENCODE
The modENCODE Project, Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was initiated by the funding of applications received in response to Requests for Applications (RFAs) HG-06-006, entitled Identification of All Functional Elements in Selected Model Organism Genomes and HG-06-007, entitled A Data Coordination Center for the Model Organism ENCODE Project (modENCODE).

The Knockout Mouse Project
The Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) was a trans-National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiative that aimed to generate a comprehensive and public resource comprised of mice containing a null mutation in every gene in the mouse genome. (See: The NIH Knockout Mouse Project Web Site [nih.gov])

.

Top of page

Posted: October 15, 2012