Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Inflammatory Disease Geomics Branch

Sharon K. Davis, M.Ed., M.P.A., Ph.D.

Sharon K. Davis
Senior Scientist
Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Inflammatory Disease Genomics Branch

Head
Social Epidemiology Research Unit


B.A. University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, 1980
M.Ed. Northeastern University, 1983
M.P.A. Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government, 1987
Ph.D. Brandeis University, 1991

phone (301) 594-2970
fax (301) 480-0063
e-mail sharon.davis@nih.gov
Building 10A, Room 7N320
10 CENTER DR, MSC 1644
BETHESDA, MD 20892-1644

Selected Publications


Dr. Davis' research has focused on the effects of social determinants on cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity among disproportionately affected sub-populations. Her lab is now engaged in an emerging field of human social genomics.  This research identifies the types of genes that are subject to social-environmental regulations, the neural and molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of social processes on gene expression, and the genetic polymorphisms that moderate individual differences in genomic sensitivity to social context.

Dr. Davis' lab is also assessing the association of ancestry on sub-clinical cardiovascular risk factors among African-Americans and skin color as a phenotype associated with genetic ancestry and cardiovascular outcomes.  The group is measuring differential telomere length correlated to cardiovascular outcomes and social determinants on telomere length among African-Americans.

Dr. Davis' team, along with other investigators in the Cardiovascular Section, have implemented a research protocol with the objective of developing a community-based cohort and novel genomic science resource for defining the biological significance of ancestry-related genomic variation in African-Americans related to cardiovascular disease.  The study is designed to test the hypothesis that race-ancestry differences in the burden of cardiovascular disease in African-Americans reflects the influence of a unique interplay between the distinct genomic variations characteristic of African-Americans and the "exposome" of social determinants and environmental factors that influence the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

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Last Updated: May 21, 2014