Proteomics Workshop Agenda

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institutes of Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


Proteomics Planning Workshop

Agenda

The purpose of this meeting is to discuss how the National Cancer Institute, the National Human Genome Research Institute, and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences might best invest in proteomics research.

Thursday, April 25, 2002
8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
8:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m. Introduction and Purpose of the Meeting
David Eisenberg and Richard Weinshilboum, Co-chairs
8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Institute Goals and Expectations

The emerging field of proteomics encompasses an enormous range of studies. The goal of this meeting is to receive guidance on the most compelling opportunities and challenges in proteomics and their priorities, in order for the institutes to provide the most benefit to the biomedical research community. This workshop is not intended to result in recommendations for specific initiatives, such as RFAs, but rather a wider vision of what is needed in the field over the next decade. This vision will provide the context for the institutes to make decisions about specific programs and initiatives. The agenda lists several specific questions that we believe the workshop should address; other important issues will undoubtedly arise during the workshop.

Dinah Singer, NCI; Marvin Cassman, NIGMS; Francis Collins, NHGRI
9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Biology Session
Alfred Gilman, Session Leader

Presentation of the Issues
Steven Clarke, Erin O'Shea, Gavin MacBeath
[20 minutes each]

Roundtable Discussion [45 minutes]
Commentators: William Studier, Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Ray Deshaies
[10 minutes each]
What kinds of proteomic information will be most useful for the community to address basic biological questions? Why?
10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Break
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Medicine Session
Arthur Horwich, Session Leader

Presentation of the Issues
Louis Staudt, Timothy Buchman, Lance Liotta
[20 minutes each]

Roundtable Discussion [45 minutes]
Commentators: Harold Dvorak, Patrick Griffin, Michael Yaffe
[10 minutes each]
What kinds of proteomic information will be most useful to the community to advance biomedical research and human health? Why?
12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. Break for Lunch
1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Medicine Session (continued)
2:45 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Technology Session
Jonathan Weissman, Session Leader

Presentation of the Issues
Peer Bork, Michael Snyder, Ruedi Aebersold
[20 minutes each]

Roundtable Discussion [45 minutes]
Commentators: David Sabatini, Marc Vidal, John Yates [10 minutes each]
What are the best current and emerging proteomics technologies and what are their limitations? What is on the horizon?
5:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Emerging Themes
(Co-chairs will introduce questions for tomorrow's discussion to give an opportunity for participants to think about these issues overnight. Additional questions may be added by co-chairs and session leaders as a result of today's discussion.)
  • What are the important proteomic questions to answer and what is their utility in advancing medicine and biological research?
  • What is the best technology to address each question?
    • Which mix of technologies and specific data types is desirable? Which are most powerful? What key technologies need to be developed to enable or optimize a large-scale effort to address each question?
    • Which technologies should be made robust to allow for facile technology transfer? Which are better as more centralized technologies because of expense and non-portability?
    • What materials (e.g., clones/libraries, chips) should be made available to the biomedical community?
  • Which of these questions or types of information is ready to be addressed now, or in the near future by a large-scale effort?
    • What would that effort look like and how could it be implemented?
    • What are the costs?
    • How would your answer change if the time horizon were five years, rather than two years? Ten Years?
7:00 p.m.

Dinner for Invited Speakers and Moderators
Faryab Restaurant, 4917 Cordell Avenue, Bethesda, MD

Friday, April 26
8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Presentation of summaries from yesterday's sessions in the context of the questions outlined above.
  8:30 a.m. - 8:50 a.m. Biology Session Summary
Alfred Gilman [5 minutes]
Discussants: Steven Clarke, Ray Deshaies, Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Gavin MacBeath, Erin O'Shea, William Studier
  8:50 a.m. - 9:10 a.m. Medicine Session Summary
Arthur Horwich [5 minutes]
Discussants: Timothy Buchman, Harold Dvorak, Patrick Griffin, Lance Liotta, Louis Staudt, Michael Yaffe
  9:10 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Technology Session Summary
Jonathan Weissman [5 minutes]
Discussants: Ruedi Aebersold, Peer Bork, David Sabatini, Michael Snyder, Marc Vidal, John Yates
9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Discussion of Emerging Themes
Jonathan Weissman and William Gelbart, Discussion Leaders

The questions listed below are those that the organizing Institutes have identified as important issues that need to be addressed in order to provide the broad vision and guidance for programmatic direction. Additional questions may be added to this list as a result of the discussions. A workshop report will be written following the meeting based on this discussion, and these questions will serve as a draft outline of the report.
  • What are the important proteomic questions to answer and what is their utility in advancing medicine and biological research?
  • What is the best technology to address each question?
    • Which mix of technologies and specific data types is desirable? Which are most powerful? What key technologies need to be developed to enable or optimize a large-scale effort to address each question?
    • Which technologies should be made robust to allow for facile technology transfer? Which are better as more centralized technologies because of expense and non-portability?
    • What materials (e.g., clones/libraries, chips) should be made available to the biomedical community?
  • Which of these questions or types of information is ready to be addressed now, or in the near future by a large-scale effort?
    • What would that effort look like and how could it be implemented?
    • What are the costs?
    • How would your answer change if the time horizon were five years, rather than two years? Ten Years?
10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Break
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Synthesis of Discussion

Development and Prioritization of Recommendations
David Eisenberg and Richard Weinshilboum, Co-chairs
12:30 p.m. Adjournment

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Last Reviewed: January 2006