2005 Release: NIH Nationwide Network of Molecular Libraries Screening Centers

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institutes of Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


NIH News

NIH Creates Nationwide Network of Molecular Libraries Screening Centers
To Accelerate Study of Human Biology and Disease

"Roadmap" Grants Will Establish Nine New Centers in Seven States

BETHESDA, Md., Wed., June 15th, 2005 — The National Institutes of Health (NIH) today announced it is awarding $88.9 million in grants to nine institutions over three years to establish a collaborative research network that will use high-tech screening methods to identify small molecules that can be used as research tools. Small molecules have great potential to help scientists in their efforts to learn more about key biological processes involved in human health and disease.

"This tremendous collaborative effort will accelerate our understanding of biology and disease mechanisms," said Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., NIH director. "More importantly, it will, for the first time, enable academic researchers to explore novel ideas and enable progress on a broad front against human disease."

For example, the broad-based screening effort will eventually enable researchers to explore the hundreds of thousands of proteins believed to be encoded by the approximately 25,000 genes in the human genome. To date, only a few hundred human proteins have been studied in detail using small molecule probes.

Certain small organic chemical compounds, also referred to as small molecules, can be valuable tools for understanding the many important cellular events involved in health and disease, which is key to identifying possible new targets for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. To date, most useful small molecules have been found serendipitously. The molecular libraries screening program is an effort by NIH to take an efficient, high-throughput approach toward the discovery of many more useful compounds.

The Molecular Libraries Screening Centers Network (MLSCN) is being developed through the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Specifically, the network is part of the Roadmap's "New Pathways to Discovery" initiative, which has set out to advance the understanding of biological systems and build a better "toolbox" for medical researchers in the 21st century. The network is funded by all of the institutes of the NIH and co-administered by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) on behalf of NIH. The operation of the network will be overseen by a project team made up of staff from NIH's 27 institutes and centers.

Data generated from the high-throughput assays conducted at the screening centers will be made available to researchers in both the public and private sectors through the PubChem database at (PubChem), created and managed by the National Library of Medicine at NIH. The network's first screening center, the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC), was established in June 2004 by the NHGRI's intramural program to jumpstart the roadmap effort. Another critical component of the network is the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository, located in San Francisco at Discovery Partners International, a drug discovery research firm. The repository houses the collection of small molecules that will be used for screening by the centers. Already, the repository has acquired nearly 100,000 compounds that are being utilized by the NCGC.

"This new Screening Centers Network will be the engine of discovery in the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries initiative," said NIMH Director Thomas R. Insel, M.D. "Using the compounds from the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository and supported by the informatics capabilities of PubChem, the MLSCN should provide researchers with many new chemical tools to explore how cells function at the molecular level."

"This collaborative screening effort will enable academic and government researchers to contribute in a much more vigorous way to an understanding of the mechanisms of disease, and even to the identification of potential targets for new therapies. Central to this effort are the databases supporting the network, which will allow us to tie together data from diverse fields of science in ways not previously brought to bear on important health problems," said NHGRI Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.

The nine institutions receiving grants as part of the MLSCN are:
About NIH

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) - The Nation's Medical Research Agency - is comprised of 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

About the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research

The NIH Roadmap is a series of new initiatives designed to pursue major opportunities and gaps in biomedical research that no single NIH institute could tackle alone but which the agency as a whole can address to make the biggest impact possible on the progress of medical research and to catalyze changes that will serve to transform new scientific knowledge into tangible benefits for public health. Additional information about the NIH Roadmap can be found at its web site, http://commonfund.nih.gov/.

About NIMH and NHGRI

NIMH and NHGRI co-lead the Molecular Libraries Roadmap Initiative and are among the 27 institutes and centers at NIH. NIMH works to reduce the burden of mental illness and behavioral disorders through research on mind, brain, and behavior. Additional information about NIMH can be found at its Web site, www.nimh.nih.gov. NHGRI supports the development of resources and technology that will accelerate genome research and its application to human health. Information about NHGRI can be found at its Web site, www.genome.gov.

Contacts:

Jules Asher

NIMH Press Office
(301) 443-4536
NIMHpress@nih.gov

Geoff Spencer
NHGRI Press Office

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Last Reviewed: July 24, 2012