NHGRI Webinar Series

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institutes of Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


NHGRI Webinar SeriesNHGRI Webinar Series

Welcome to the NHGRI webinar series on current topics related to genomics, health and society hosted by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health.

The goal of this series is to engage public health communities, advocacy groups, health providers and members of the public in discussion about the latest topics in genomics.

Most Recent Webinar: Thursday, January 14, 2010, 1 p.m. Eastern

The PhenX Toolkit - Get the Most from your Measures

PhenX Logo

About the Webinar

Erin Ramos,Ph.D., from NHGRI's Office of Population Genomics, will summarize the rationale for the PhenX project and provide an overview of how to access and use the PhenX Toolkit. The PhenX project, which stands for consensus measures for Phenotypes and eXposures, seeks to identify phenotypic and environmental measurements (i.e. demographics, anthropometrics, substance use, nutrition) that can be collected in a comparable way across multiple genomic studies. The PhenX toolkit provides a common currency for investigators who want to effectively combine and/or compare their data with data from other studies. You can visit the PhenX Toolkit at www.phenxtookit.org.

About Dr. Ramos

Dr. Erin RamosErin Ramos, Ph.D., is an epidemiologist in the Office of Population Genomics, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). She manages a portfolio of research in population genomics including a collaborative project to develop a set of standardized phenotypic and exposure measures for use in genome-wide association studies and related research. She serves as the chair of the Data Access Committee (DAC) for the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) and as a member of NHGRI's DAC. Her research interests include the genetic epidemiology of dementia, genome-wide association studies and gene-environment interactions in complex disease, and ELSI research including informed consent for large-scale genomic studies.

YouTube video Listen to the Webinar: The PhenX Toolkit - Get the Most from your Measures


Past Webinars

October 15, 2009

Human Skin Microflora: DNA Sequence-Based Approach to Examining Hand Disease

Julie A. Segre

About the Webinar

The skin creates a barrier between the body and the environment. Using animal models, Dr. Julie Segre's laboratory focuses on the genetic pathways involved in building and repairing this skin barrier. The Segre laboratory estimates that approximately one million bacteria reside on each square centimeter of skin and many common skin conditions are associated with both impaired skin barrier function and increased microbial colonization. Dr. Segre moderated the discussion, answered questions and addressed comments. In addition, the webinar discussed details of the Human Microbiome Project.

About Dr. Segre

Julie Segre, Ph.D., is a senior investigator in the Genetics and Molecular Biology Branch. She is also an active participant in the Human Microbiome Project, an effort launched as part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research to comprehensively characterize human microbiota. (See: NIH Roadmap for Medical Research: Human Microbiome Project).

Listen to the Webinar: Human Skin Microflora: DNA Sequence-Based Approach to Examining Hand Disease


June 3, 2009

Planning for the Future of Genomics

Alan E. Guttmacher

As part of the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) next long-range planning process, NHGRI hosted an online webinar to hear questions or comments about where the field of genomics should be going in the next several years. Dr. Alan Guttmacher, Acting Director of NHGRI presented Planning for the Future of Genomics — including details related to the planning process — and moderated the discussion, answered questions and addressed comments.

NHGRI has produced four white papers that address specific issues that have already been identified as needing broad input: NHGRI White Papers for the Planning Process.

Listen to the Webinar: Planning for the Future of Genomics


March 12, 2009

Using Evolution to Decode the Human Genome

The duck-billed platypus. Courtesy: Nicole Duplaix, Getty Images Why should we care about the platypus genome sequence?

It almost seems like a genome sequence now exists for nearly every living thing. Whether it's a fruit fly, hedgehog, or the duck-billed platypus, the genomics research world has produced enormous amounts of DNA sequence. How do we make sense of all of these data? The key is in comparisons. The comparisons of sequences from different species provide clues about the evolutionary forces that have uniquely sculpted each genome into its modern-day form. These clues lead to information about genome function, and ultimately to insights that can improve human health.

In this webinar, NHGRI Scientific Director Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., presented an overview of the utility of comparative sequence analyses and show how these comparisons shed light on how genomes work and how these studies are relevant to human health.

This webinar will be available online soon.


January 8, 2009

The Long and Short of It: Finding Genes for Complex Traits In the Domestic Dog

Afghan and Chihuahua standing in a field. Photo credit Edouard Cadieu, NHGRI On January 8, 2009 at 1 p.m. Eastern, NHGRI presented it's latest Webinar: The Long and Short of It: Finding Genes for Complex Traits In the Domestic Dog. Vence Bonham, J.D., Chief of the Education and Community Involvement Branch at NHGRI, hosted Elaine Ostrander, Ph.D. Chief of the Cancer Genetics Branch, who shared the latest research on the dog genome, and why this information is important for the broader field of genomic research.

Listen to the Webinar: The Long and Short of It: Finding Genes for Complex Traits In the Domestic Dog

 

 


November 20, 2008

Genome-Wide Association Studies: Hunting for Genes in the New Millennium

DNA double helix and G W A S

On November 20, 2008, Genome-Wide Association Studies: Hunting for Genes in the New Millennium was hosted by Greg Feero, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of NHGRI's Genomic Healthcare Branch. Teri Manolio, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Office of Population Genomics reported the latest on GWAS results and talked about genomics and health.

Listen to the full webinar: Genome-Wide Association Studies: Hunting for Genes in the New Millennium

 


September 11, 2008

Family History: The Next Generation

Families. My Family Health Portrait. A tool from the Surgeon General.Family History: The Next Generation presented information related to family health history with NHGRI Acting Director Alan Guttmacher, M.D., host, and Greg Feero, M.D., Ph.D., chief of NHGRI's Genomics Healthcare Branch. Efforts to improve the utilization of family history information in healthcare and the importance of engaging communities was discussed, along with how one community successfully engaged in using their family health history information.

Listen to the full webinar: Family History, the Next Generation

 


July 17, 2008

All About the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)

People with double helix and the letters A T C G in the backgroundWhat is GINA? How will it affect me? How will I - and my family - be protected? NHGRI Deputy Director Alan Guttmacher, NHGRI Senior Health Policy Analyst M.K. Holohan, and President and CEO of the Genetic Alliance Sharon Terry discussed these GINA topics and more.

Listen to the full webinar: All About the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)

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Last Updated: February 21, 2012