NIH

The Johns Hopkins University/National Human Genome Research Institute Genetic Counseling Training Program

GCTP Clinical Supervisor Bios

Natalie Beck

Natalie Beck

Natalie Beck is a certified genetic counselor at the Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins. She provides genetic counseling to pediatric and adult patients and their families in the Greenberg Skeletal Dysplasia Clinic as well as in the multidisciplinary Cleft and Craniofacial Clinics.  As part of her role in the Skeletal Dysplasia Clinic she helps to coordinate and execute the medical clinics at the annual Little People of America meetings.  She has a particular interest in the area of patient advocacy.  She teaches and supervises genetic counseling students, fellows, residents, medical students and undergraduate students interested in the field of genetic counseling.  Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she worked for three years as a pediatric and adult clinical genetic counselor at Rhode Island Hospital and also coordinated the RI State Metabolic Newborn Screening Program. She her Masters in Genetic Counseling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. She is a diplomate and member of the American Board of Genetic Counseling and is a member of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.


Delphine Blain 

Delphine Blain

Delphine Blain has been a certified genetic counselor at the National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 11 years. As part of a team of four doctors and two counselors, she provides genetic counseling to patients with a wide range of ophthalmic diagnoses, ranging from developmental eye issues to retinal degenerations. She has been assisting Dr. Brian Brooks with his study of uveal coloboma, with the goals of better characterizing overall clinical findings associated with coloboma and discovering genes responsible for the condition. She also acts as the genetic counselor for the eyeGENE® research project, whose purpose is to facilitate research related to inherited ophthalmic disease. Ms. Blain received her Scientific Master in Genetic Counseling from Hopkins University and her MBA from Cornell University. Prior to becoming a genetic counselor, Ms. Blain was a management consultant with a consulting firm specialized in public health programs.


Julie Cohen

Julie Cohen

Julie Cohen is a genetic counselor at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in the Department of Neurology and Developmental Medicine.  She provides genetic counseling to children and adult patients and their families in the Neurogenetics, Muscle Disorders, Leukodystrophy, and developmental pediatrics clinics.  Julie and her KKI colleagues were early adopters of clinical exome sequencing and now incorporate this testing into routine practice for patients with undiagnosed neurological disorders.  Prior to coming to KKI, Julie worked as a prenatal genetic counselor at Franklin Square Hospital, Johns Hopkins, and a private maternal-fetal medicine practice. Julie's research interests include quality of life among individuals with genetic conditions and clinical applications of new genomic technologies. A native Baltimorean, Julie received her Master's degree from the Johns Hopkins/NHGRI Genetic Counseling Training Program in 2009. 


Virginia (Ginny) Corson

Virginia Corson

Virginia (Ginny) Corson is a prenatal genetic counselor at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She has worked at JHH since 1975, when she completed her training at Sarah Lawrence College. Ginny has been active in both the NSGC and ABGC, serving in a variety of roles in both organizations.


Tiffani DeMarco

Tiffani DeMarco

Tiffani DeMarco is a certified genetic counselor and co-supervisor at Inova Fairfax Hospital. She became a member of the Inova Translational Medicine Institute (ITMI) in April of 2014 bringing with her over 17 years of clinical experience counseling patients and their families at risk for hereditary cancer. She will also soon be providing counseling to patients who are pursuing clinical whole genome sequencing. Tiffani has extensive experience with genetic counseling students, having supervised numerous individuals from all of the local area genetic counseling programs and other programs across the US. Tiffani's prior areas of research have focused on alternative models of delivery of genetic counseling and family communication of BRCA1/2 genetic test results to adolescent children. She has published extensively on these topics in peer-reviewed journals and has given numerous lectures as an expert in the field of cancer genetic counseling. She also has almost ten years of experience facilitating a support group for BRCA1/2 carriers which provided long-term psychological and educational follow-up for patients. Tiffani is an active member of NSCG, participating in the Practice Guidelines Committee and the Cancer and Personalized Medicine special interest groups.


Grace-Ann Fasaye

Grace-Ann Fasaye

Grace-Ann Fasaye is a genetic counselor at the National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research. Grace-Ann received her Masters of Science degree in Genetic Counseling from the Johns Hopkins/National Human Genome Research Institute genetic counseling program and is certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. She is also an alumna of City of Hope Cancer Center's Intensive Course in Cancer Risk Assessment.


Tara Hart

Tara Hart

Tara Hart is the Assistant Director of Postgraduate Education and Lead Cardiovascular Genetic Counselor at GeneDx. Tara has an expertise in cardiovascular testing for inherited arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies, and thoracic aortic aneurism and dissection.  She has a particular interest in the genetic autopsy following a sudden cardiac death. Tara also serves as a faculty member of the medical genetics residency and fellowship training at the NIH/NHGRI program and is establishing a remote genetic counseling course though GeneDx focusing on laboratory-based genetic counseling.  She graduated from the genetic counseling program at Boston University.  Prior to working at GeneDx, Tara was a prenatal genetic counselor at Women and Infants Hospital in Rhode Island. While at Women and Infants Hospital, Tara was involved in recruiting patients for a study investigating and validating the use of noninvasive prenatal testing.  She is a diplomat of the American Board of Genetic Counseling and a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), NSGC's cardiac special interest group, and NSGC's education special interest group.


Sarah Hash

Sarah Hash

Sarah Hash is a certified genetic counselor who provides preconception and prenatal genetic counseling services for Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates of Maryland, a private perinatology office in Rockville, Maryland. Sarah meets with both average-risk and high-risk patients to discuss and coordinate testing options such as: non-invasive prenatal screening, preeclampsia screening, and expanded carrier screening. Other common indications for a genetic counseling session include: teratogen exposure, recurrent pregnancy loss, positive screening results, and ultrasound anomalies.  Prior to joining the team at MFMA of MD,  Sarah worked as a prenatal genetic counselor at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, VA.  She received her Masters of Science degree in Genetic Counseling from the University of South Carolina, School of Medicine. She is a member of both the American Board of Genetic Counseling and the National Society of Genetic Counselors. 


Cindy James

Cindy James

Cindy James is a genetic counselor and Research Associate at the Johns Hopkins ARVD/C program in the Division of Cardiology. She primarily conducts clinical psychosocial, and genetic research on this rare inherited cardiomyopathy as well as other inherited cardiac conditions including Hypertrophic Cardiomyopthy and Barth Syndrome. Cindy received a masters' degree from the Johns Hopkins/NIH genetic counseling program and a PhD in Human Genetics from Johns Hopkins. In addition to her work with the ARVD/C program, Cindy is actively involved in developing interdepartmental research-studies to investigate psychosocial and policy implications of evolving genetic technologies.  She welcomes students interested in the intersection of research and clinical care.


Barbara Karczeski

Barbara KarczeskiBarbara Karczeski is a genetic counselor with the Johns Hopkins University DNA Diagnostic Laboratory in Baltimore, Maryland.  She provides pre- and post-test consultation to referrers and performs variant assessment and classification for clinical reports.  Prior to joining the laboratory, she was a prenatal genetic counselor with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.  She completed a Bachelor of Arts in Biology at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland, and a Master of Science in Human Genetics at Virginia Commonwealth University / Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, VA.  She also holds a Master of Arts in English from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona.  She is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and the American College of Genetics and Genomics.


Cathleen Lawson

Cathleen LawsonCathleen Lawson is a certified genetic counselor at the Johns Hopkins Prenatal Diagnosis and Treatment Center. She has been providing genetic counseling in the Department of GYN/OB for over 25 years and has participated in the education of medical students, OB residents, maternal fetal medicine fellow, genetics fellows and genetic counseling graduate students. Ms. Lawson has a particular interest in the genetics of infertility and has served on the Johns Hopkins Assisted Reproductive Technologies Oversight Committee for the past 15 years.  She has also served on the Johns Hopkins Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Task Force through the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, assisting in the development of PGD services at Johns Hopkins.  She completed her undergraduate training at Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Science in Psychobiology and her Master of Science in genetic counseling at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a diplomate and member of the American Board of Genetic Counseling and a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.


Katie Lewis

Katie Lewis

Katie Lewis is a genetic counselor and protocol coordinator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). She provides counseling to participants who take part in the ClinSeqTM project, which is piloting the implementation of large-scale medical sequencing. Prior to coming to the NIH, she worked at the Kennedy Krieger Institute's Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) as a genetic counselor and research coordinator. Katie received her training at the Johns Hopkins University/NHGRI genetic counseling training program.


Gretchen Oswald MacCarrick

Gretchen Oswald

Gretchen Oswald MacCarrick is a genetic counselor at the Johns Hopkins University. She provides genetic counseling primarily in the Connective tissue clinic. Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she trained at Virginia Commonwealth University-Medical College of Virginia. In addition to her work, she also   Co-founder and Board member of the Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Foundation.

 


Weiyi Mu
Weiyi Mu

Weiyi Mu is a clinical genetic counselor at the Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins University. She currently staffs the General Genetics Clinic as well as disease-specialty clinics, including the Neurogenetics Clinic, Ataxia Clinic, ALS Clinic, and the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Center for Excellence. She received her Master of Science in Genetic Counseling from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2013 and is certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. She has a special interest in neurodegenerative disorders, illness as a metaphor, and international development of the genetic counseling field.


Brittney Murray

Brittney Murray

Brittney Murray is a genetic counselor Johns Hopkins Hospital in cardiology in the ARVD/C Program and Center for Inherited Heart Disease. She provides genetic counseling to patients from around the world with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC): a rare inherited cardiomyopathy predisposing to arrhythmias and sudden death and also other patients with histories of cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, and sudden death. Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she trained at the University of Michigan. In addition to her direct clinical care of cardiac patients, she is actively involved in the ARVD/C Program's many research projects, advocacy, and is an active member of the NSGC Cardiac SIG.


June Peters

June Peters

June Peters is the senior genetic counselor at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in the Clinical Genetics Branch (CGB) of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) . She provides cancer genetic counseling primarily for the NCI Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) Study. In addition she conducts psychosocial research using the Colored Eco-Genetic Relationship Map (CEGRM), pioneered by this group. Prior to coming to NIH, June has worked in a variety of settings including tertiary care medical institutions, a breast center, private genetic testing laboratory, county and state health departments.

 


Sarah Ruppert

Photo available soon

Sarah Ruppert is a genetic counselor and cancer genetics program co-supervisor at Inova in Fairfax, Virginia.  As a member of the Inova Translational Medicine Institute, Sarah sees adult patients for hereditary cancer risk assessment and will soon be providing counseling for patients (and their parents) who are pursuing clinical whole genome sequencing.  Prior to joining Inova she worked at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) as a protocol coordinator and held clinical cancer genetic counseling roles at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and at Allina Health System in Minnesota.  She has served as a graduate student clinical supervisor in all of her previous positions and also coordinated journal club for graduate students at the University of Minnesota training program.  She received her Masters of Science degree in Genetic Counseling from the University of Minnesota program in 2002.  Sarah has served on the editorial board for the Journal of Genetic Counseling and is an active member of National Society of Genetic Counselors, including the Cancer and Personalized Medicine special interest groups.


Katie Sagaser

Katy Sagaser

Katie Sagaser is a certified genetic counselor at the Prenatal Diagnosis and Treatment Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital.  She received her undergraduate degree in Biopsychology from Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, and received her Masters degree in genetic counseling from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in Houston, Texas.  Katie has a particular interest in the impact of religiosity and spirituality in genetic counseling.  She is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.


Morgan Similuk

Morgan Similuk

Morgan Similuk is a genetic counselor at the NIH, providing education and counseling for hereditary disorders of the immune system affecting patients across the lifespan.  She is particularly interested in adolescent transitions and adaptation in chronic illness. Much of her work involves the management and delivery of information from whole exome sequencing and other new technologies.  Additionally, she serves as faculty at the Johns Hopkins/NIH genetic counseling training program, teaching a 16-week course on Facilitating Family Adaptation to Loss and Disability.  She has ongoing collaborations with social and behavioral researchers at the Hopkins Center for Genetics and Literacy, as well as the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Together, her clinical practice and research further efforts to improve the use of new genetic technologies and patient psychosocial outcomes.


Jennifer Sloan

Photo available soon

Jennifer Sloan is a certified genetic counselor and protocol coordinator at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) since 2004. She provides genetic counseling for participants in a natural history study for methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and cobalamin disorders, a group of inborn errors of organic acid metabolism, and in the past also worked on a natural history study for neurofibromatosis type 1 at NHGRI.  Prior to coming to the NIH, completed her Ph.D. in neurobiology at the University of North Carolina and received her M.S. in genetic counseling from Northwestern University. Jennifer has a special interest in translational research including identifying new genes involved in MMA metabolism and using zebrafish to understand the pathophysiology of the metabolic disorders she studies in the clinic. 


Christy Smith

Christy Haakonsen

Christy Smith  is a certified genetic counselor at the Johns Hopkins Institute of Genetic Medicine in Baltimore, MD. She sees pediatric and adult general genetics patients. Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she worked as a cancer genetic counselor at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center and the Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center in Rockville, MD as an Information Specialist. She received her Masters of Science degree in Genetic Counseling from the Johns Hopkins/National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) genetic counseling program. In addition to her clinical work, she is an active member in the National Society of Genetic Counselors Cancer (SIG).


Crystal Tichnell

Crystal Tichnell

Crystal Tichnell is a genetic counselor and program coordinator at the Johns Hopkins ARVD/C Program in the Division of Cardiology. She is the first point of contact for patients and families seeking information about Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy.  She is primarily involved in coordinating and conducting various research projects on this rare inherited cardiomyopathy. In addition, she provides genetic counseling, coordinates the annual ARVD/C Patient and Family Seminar and maintains the program website, www.arvd.com. Crystal received her Masters in Genetic Counseling from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She is also an active member of the NSGC Cardiac SIG.    


Amy Turriff

Amy Turriff

Amy Turriff is a genetic counselor at the National Eye Institute. She provides genetic counseling to clinical research participants with Usher syndrome, X-linked retinoschisis, and achromatopsia. She also provides counseling to children and adults with other inherited retinal degenerations. Prior to joining the National Eye Institute, she trained at the JHU/NHGRI genetic counseling training program. In addition to her clinical work, she is actively involved with an advocacy organization for individuals with sex chromosome conditions. 

 


 

Last Updated: September 13, 2016