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Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

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Milton English, Ph.D. defines Candidate Gene

Candidate Gene

KAN di date JEEN

A candidate gene is a gene whose chromosomal location is associated with a particular disease or other phenotype. Because of its location, the gene is suspected of causing the disease or other phenotype.

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Candidate Gene

A candidate gene is a gene whose chromosomal location is associated with a particular disease or other phenotype. Because of its location, the gene is suspected of causing the disease or other phenotype.

Narration Transcription

A candidate gene is a gene whose chromosomal location fits with a particular disease or phenotype that you're looking for. An example of this is when you're doing any type of linkage analysis and you're trying to find the disease gene that's associated with that particular disease. You use what we call genetic markers, and the markers will tell you, okay, based on what you see, the recombination frequency, etc., the gene has to be between marker X and marker Y. And what that means is that this distance between marker X and marker Y constitutes your candidate region, and all the genes in that region will be a candidate gene. And now the next thing for you to do is then to look individually at each of those genes to see if they have the mutation that's associated with the disease that you're looking for.


Doctor Profile

Milton English, Ph.D.

Milton English, Ph.D.

Occupation
Postdoctoral Fellow, Genetics and Molecular Biology Branch

Biography
As a senior research fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Paul Liu, Dr. Milton English uses mouse and zebrafish models to study hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. This work on zebrafish is focused on identifying and characterizing genes that are involved in myeloid development (white blood cell) and their role in leukemia. By understanding how these genes function normally, researchers can begin to understand what happens when they are mutated or mis-expressed in leukemia. With this research, Dr. Milton and his team have identified several bloodless (having no or reduced blood cells) lines of fish and are in the process of mapping and cloning the mutated genes.

How to cite this termHow to cite this term for research papers

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