Skip Navigation
NIH

Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

Listen to Definition

Christopher P. Austin, M.D. defines Genetic Epidemiology

Genetic Epidemiology

Genetic epidemiology is a relatively new medical discipline that seeks to understand how genetic factors interact with the environment in the context of disease in populations. Areas of study include the causes of inherited disease and its distribution and control.

How to cite this term How to cite this term for research papers

Related Terms

Illustrations


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Genetic Epidemiology

Genetic epidemiology is a relatively new medical discipline that seeks to understand how genetic factors interact with the environment in the context of disease in populations. Areas of study include the causes of inherited disease and its distribution and control.

Narration Transcription

Genetic epidemiology... It's a relatively new field. Epidemiology itself is not. Epidemiology refers in general to the study of populations and characteristics of populations, but the addition of genetic to the word epidemiology in recent years connotes the influence that genetic factors have on disease incidence or other traits that characterize individuals in a population, whether those are people or other individuals in a population; most often people. Importantly, because what we're studying in genetic epidemiology is people in an environment, what one observes in genetic epidemiology is not simply the genetic characteristics of the individuals across the population, but also the environmental influences that those populations are subject to in the area in which they live.


Doctor Profile

Christopher P. Austin, M.D.

Christopher P. Austin, M.D.

Occupation
Director, NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC); Senior Advisor for Translational Research, Office of the Director

Biography
Dr. Austin's research focuses on development of reagents and technologies to translate genome sequence into functional insights. As director of the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC), part of a network of screening centers that produce chemical probes for use in biological research and drug development, Dr. Austin is spearheading a chemical genomics program that brings the power of small-molecule chemistry and informatics to the elucidation of gene function. Just as the Human Genome Project accelerated gene identification, this initiative promises to speed discoveries on gene function and lead to the development of new therapies for human disease.

How to cite this termHow to cite this term for research papers

Related Terms

About the Talking Glossary
all Top