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NIH

The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds genetic and genomic research and promotes that research to advance genomics in health care.

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We need your input: dbGaP Data Submission and Access Process

NHGRI believes that broadly sharing research data will result in maximum public benefit, and we're committed to providing researchers with access to genomic data. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Genomic Data Sharing Policy establishes a system to promote data sharing, while also protecting research participants involved in genomics studies. We need your help to improve one of NIH's central data sharing tools for human genomic data: the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes, or dbGaP.

ENCODE Reddit AMA Participants: Mike Pazin, Dan Gilchrist and Elise Feingold

Reddit "Ask Me Anything": The ENCODE Project

NHGRI's ENCODE Project has spent 13 years building a catalog of all the functional elements in the human genome sequence, and making it available to scientists worldwide for the study of human health and disease. On February 9, 2017, ENCODE program directors in the Division of Genome Sciences at NHGRI, and ENCODE researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, turned to Reddit - a social news website and discussion forum - to answer questions from the Reddit community. Here's an event recap.

Doctor showing sequence data on iPad to patient

New NIH-ACMG fellowship to boost pool of physicians managing genomic medicine programs

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), in partnership with the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG), is seeking qualified physicians interested in acquiring credentials and experience to lead genomic medicine research and implementation programs at the NIH, major medical centers and other organizations. The goal of this fellowship is to increase the pool of physicians trained in managing research and implementation programs in genomic medicine.

Melanoma

NIH study reveals how melanoma spreads

Newly identified genes and genetic pathways in primary melanoma - the most serious form of skin cancer - could give researchers additional targets for developing new, personalized treatments for melanoma and, potentially, other cancers. Learning how these genes are expressed - turned on or off - could be used in the future to predict how and when the cancer cells will spread to other parts of the body and how fast they will grow. Read the study in the February 6, 2017, online issue of Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research.

Jeffrey Schloss

Jeffery Schloss, a pioneer of genome sequencing technology, retires

Jeffery Schloss, Ph.D., director of the Division of Genome Sciences at NHGRI, has retired after a successful career leading NHGRI's DNA Sequencing Technology Development Program and launching the Centers of Excellence in Genomics Sciences (CEGS) program. Known for his intellect, leadership and dedication, Dr. Schloss shares the story of his career path and the significant contributions he and his team achieved while at NHGRI.