GCTP Clinical Supervisor Bios

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institutes of Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


The Johns Hopkins University/National Human Genome Research Institute Genetic Counseling Training Program

GCTP Clinical Supervisor Bios

Natalie Beck
Natalie Beck

Natalie Beck is a certified genetic counselor at the Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins. She provides genetic counseling to pediatric and adult patients and their families in the General Genetics Clinic as well as in the multidisciplinary Cleft Clinic. She has a particular interest in the area of patient advocacy. Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she worked for three years as a pediatric and adult clinical genetic counselor at Rhode Island Hospital and also coordinated the Fragile X Clinic and the State Metabolic Newborn Screening Program. She was a Teaching Associate in Pediatrics through the Brown Medical School in Providence, RI. She completed her undergraduate training at The George Washington University in Washington, DC with a Bachelors of Science in Pre-Professional Health/Exercise Science and her Masters in Genetic Counseling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. She is a diplomate and member of the American Board of Genetic Counseling and a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.


Delphine Blain
Delphine Blain

Delphine Blain has been a certified genetic counselor at the National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), for 10 years. As part of a team of four doctors and two counselors, she provides genetic counseling to patients with a wide range of ophthalmic diagnoses, ranging from developmental eye issues to retinal degenerations. She has been assisting Dr. Brian Brooks with his study of uveal coloboma, whose goals are to better characterize overall clinical findings associated with coloboma, and discover the genes responsible for the condition. She also acts as the genetic counselor for the eyeGENEŽ research project, a partnership with laboratories across the U.S. with the purpose of facilitating research into the genetic causes of ophthalmic disease by broadening patient accessibility to diagnostic genetic testing. Ms. Blain received her Scientific Master in Genetic Counseling from Hopkins University and her MBA from Cornell University. Prior to becoming a genetic counselor, Ms. Blain was a management consultant with a consulting firm specialized in public health programs.


Morgan Butrick
Morgan Butrick

Morgan Butrick is a genetic counselor at the NIH, providing education and counseling for hereditary disorders of the immune system affecting patients across the lifespan.  She is particularly interested in adolescent transitions and adaptation in chronic illness. Much of her work involves the management and delivery of information from whole exome sequencing and other new technologies.  Additionally, she serves as faculty at the Johns Hopkins/NIH genetic counseling training program, teaching a 16-week course on Facilitating Family Adaptation to Loss and Disability.  She has ongoing collaborations with social and behavioral researchers at the Hopkins Center for Genetics and Literacy, as well as the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Together, her clinical practice and research further efforts to improve the use of new genetic technologies and patient psychosocial outcomes.


Virginia (Ginny) Corson
Virginia Corson

Virginia (Ginny) Corson is a prenatal genetic counselor at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She has worked at JHH since 1975, when she completed her training at Sarah Lawrence College. Ginny has been active in both the NSGC and ABGC, serving in a variety of roles in both organizations


Christy Haakonsen
Christy Haakonsen

Christy Haakonsen is a genetic counselor at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center (GBMC) in Towson, MD. She sees adult patients for hereditary cancer risk assessment and also works closely with Dr. Clair Francomano seeing adult patients with hereditary disorders of connective tissue. Prior to coming to (GBMC), she worked at the Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center in Rockville, MD as an Information Specialist. She received her Masters of Science degree in Genetic Counseling from the Johns Hopkins/National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) genetic counseling program. In addition to her clinical work, she is an active member in the National Society of Genetic Counselors.


Cindy James

Cindy James is a genetic counselor and program coordinator at the Johns Hopkins ARVD/C program in the Division of Cardiology. She provides genetic counseling for and conducts both psychosocial and genetic research on this rare inherited cardiomyopathy. Cindy received a masters' degree from the Johns Hopkins/NIH genetic counseling program and a PhD in Human Genetics from Johns Hopkins. In addition to her work with the ARVD/C program, Cindy is actively involved in developing interdepartmental research-studies to investigate psychosocial and policy implications of evolving genetic technologies.


Katie Lewis
Katie Lewis

Katie Lewis is a genetic counselor and protocol coordinator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). She provides counseling to participants who take part in the ClinSeqTM project, which is piloting the implementation of large-scale medical sequencing. Prior to coming to the NIH, she worked at the Kennedy Krieger Institute's Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) as a genetic counselor and research coordinator. Katie received her training at the Johns Hopkins University/NHGRI genetic counseling training program.


Brittney Murray
Brittney Murray

Brittney Murray is a genetic counselor Johns Hopkins Hospital in cardiology in the ARVD/C Program. She provides genetic counseling to patients from around the world with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC): a rare inherited cardiomyopathy predisposing to arrhythmias and sudden death. Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she trained at the University of Michigan. In addition to her direct clinical care of cardiac patients, she is actively involved in the ARVD/C Program's many research projects, advocacy, and is an active member of the NSGC Cardiac SIG.
 



Gretchen Oswald MacCarrick
Gretchen Oswald

Gretchen Oswald MacCarrick is a genetic counselor at the Johns Hopkins University. She provides genetic counseling primarily in the Connective tissue clinic. Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, she trained at Virginia Commonwealth University-Medical College of Virginia. In addition to her work, she also is President and Co-founder of the Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Foundation.


Beth Peshkin
Beth N. Peshkin

Beth N. Peshkin is an Associate Professor of Oncology and the Senior Genetic Counselor at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, where she has been a faculty member since 1995. She is also the Education Director for the endowed Jess and Mildred Fisher Center for Familial Cancer Research, and Co-Director of the Nontherapeutic Subject Registry Shared Resource. Ms. Peshkin received her Master of Science degree in Medical Genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1993, and is certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. She also holds a Certificate in Bioethics and Health Policy from the Loyola School of Medicine in Chicago.


June Peters
June Peters

June Peters is the senior genetic counselor at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in the Clinical Genetics Branch (CGB) of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) . She provides cancer genetic counseling primarily for the NCI Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) Study. In addition she conducts psychosocial research using the Colored Eco-Genetic Relationship Map (CEGRM), pioneered by this group. Prior to coming to NIH, June has worked in a variety of settings including tertiary care medical institutions, a breast center, private genetic testing laboratory, county and state health departments.


Amy Turriff
Amy Turriff

Amy Turriff is a genetic counselor at the National Eye Institute. She provides genetic counseling to clinical research participants with Usher syndrome, X-linked retinoschisis, and achromatopsia. She also provides counseling to children and adults with other inherited retinal degenerations. Prior to joining the National Eye Institute, she trained at the JHU/NHGRI genetic counseling training program. In addition to her clinical work, she is actively involved with an advocacy organization for individuals with sex chromosome conditions.

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Last Updated: April 1, 2015