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Genome Advance of the Month
Blood vein with DNA helices

Improving the detection of heart transplant rejection with DNA sequencing

With the hope of reducing the risks associated with heart transplants, scientists have been working diligently to develop a new, less invasive method to test for rejection. June's Genome Advance of the Month features research published in the June 18 issue of Science Translational Medicine that demonstrates how sequencing and quantification of cfdDNA can determine whether or not a heart transplant will be rejected. Read more

FDA logo

FDA proposes oversight of laboratory-developed tests

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced steps it will take to ensure that certain tests used by health care professionals to diagnose and treat patients provide accurate, consistent and reliable results to inform patient care. These steps come at a critical time for genomic, or precision, medicine. As more and more genetic tests are developed and marketed, the public must be able to rely on the accuracy and clinical validity of these tests.
Read the FDA release
Read a statement from NIH Director Francis Collins

DNA double helix

Native peoples groups and NHGRI convene symposium on genomic research

On June 23, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) convened a one-day symposium to explore perspectives surrounding Native peoples and genomic research. A Spectrum of Perspectives: Native Peoples and Genetic Research was held in association with the Smithsonian's Genome: Unlocking Life's Code. Read more

Letters of A, T, C, G

NHGRI holds workshop on the future of the genome sequencing program

On July 28-29, genome researchers, clinicians, computational biologists and others met to consider the possible size, scope and future opportunities for the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) Genome Sequencing Program (GSP). Future Opportunities for Genome Sequencing and Beyond: A Planning Workshop for the National Human Genome Research Institute was webcast live on July 28 and 29.
Video replay of each talk is now available
Read about the workshop
Follow on Twitter at #GSPfuture

Microbial biofilm of mixed species from human body. From A. Earl (Broad Institute/MIT, 2012)

Report for Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future is now available

Nearly 250 experts were convened last July for the Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future conference in Bethesda, Md., where scientists discussed current advances, challenges and opportunities for human microbiome research at the National Institutes of Health. A report of the meeting is now available in the journal Microbiome.
Read the summary
2013 meeting agenda, videos and slides

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