NHGRI Webinar Series

NHGRI Webinar Series:

Human Skin Microflora: DNA Sequence-Based Approach to Examining Hand Disease

Julie Segre, Ph.D.

The skin creates a barrier between the body and the environment. Using animal models, Dr. Julie Segre's laboratory focuses on the genetic pathways involved in building and repairing this skin barrier. The Segre laboratory estimates that approximately one million bacteria reside on each square centimeter of skin and many common skin conditions are associated with both impaired skin barrier function and increased microbial colonization. Dr. Segre moderated the discussion, answered questions and addressed comments. In addition, the webinar discussed details of the Human Microbiome Project.

About Dr. Segre

Using animal models, Dr. Julie Segre's laboratory focuses on the genetic pathways involved in building and repairing the skin barrier. The Segre laboratory estimates that approximately one million bacteria reside on each square centimeter of skin and many common skin conditions are associated with both impaired skin barrier function and increased microbial colonization.

Dr. Segre is also studying the entire collection of microbes residing on the nose and skin and their association with an inflammatory skin disease called atopic dermatitis. Her study is one of more than a dozen supported by the Human Microbiome Project, a five-year effort supported by the National Institutes of Health that will produce a resource for researchers who are seeking to use information about the genomes of all the microorganisms that live on the human body, referred to as the microbiome, to improve human health.

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Last Updated: December 26, 2013