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A nuclear membrane is a double membrane that encloses the cell nucleus. It serves to separate the chromosomes from the rest of the cell. The nuclear membrane includes an array of small holes or pores that permit the passage of certain materials, such as nucleic acids and proteins, between the nucleus and cytoplasm.




Narration



The nuclear membrane. When we divide the organisms that live on this planet, we make a distinction between those that have a nucleus, that are called eukaryotes, and those that don't have a nuclei, which we call prokaryotes. The nucleus contains all of the genetic material for a eukaryotic cell, but this genetic material needs to be protected. And it's protected by the nuclear membrane, which is a double membrane that encloses all the nuclear genetic material and all the other components of the nucleus. There are some small holes or pores that are in the nuclear membrane that allow the messenger RNA and the proteins to move between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. But the nuclear membrane is regulating what material should be in the nucleus in contrast to what material should be in the cytoplasm.

Julie A. Segre, Ph.D.

Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms


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