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NIH

The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds genetic and genomic research and promotes that research to advance genomics in health care.

Highlights

Microbes

NIH to host workshop on advances, future needs in human microbiome research

Microbes inhabit just about every part of the human body, outnumbering human cells by ten to one. The ten-year, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund Human Microbiome Project was established to understand how microbial communities impact human health. On August 16-18, 2017, NIH will host a workshop, The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century, to share the latest research on the human microbiome, and to evaluate what is needed to advance this field over the next decade.

Genomic Medicine in Diverse and Underserved Populations

NIH accelerates the use of genomics in clinical care

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is awarding $18.9 million towards research that aims to accelerates the use of genome sequencing in clinical care. The new awards will generate innovative approaches and best practices to ensure that the effectiveness of genomic medicine can be applied to all individuals and groups, including diverse and underserved populations, and in healthcare settings that extend beyond academic medical centers.

Zebrafish DNA

ASHG weighs in on human genome editing

The American Society of Human Genetics and ten other organizations have just issued a policy statement on human germline genome editing, published August 3rd in the journal American Journal of Human Genetics. Germline editing is adding, removing or replacing parts of DNA in the cells that will get passed down to the next generation. Want to learn more about genome editing? Check out our new resource: Genome Editing.

NHGRI Director Eric Green

4th ELSI Congress showcases societal implications of genomics research

This month's The Genomic Landscape reports on the three-day, 4th ELSI Congress held in June, the tenth genomic medicine meeting, which addressed research in pharmacogenomics and gives a shout out to Three-Minute Talk winner, NHGRI's own Ryan Johnson, Ph.D., a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Julie Segre, PH.D. There's also information on the new executive director of the American Society of Human Genetics.

Ryan Johnson

NHGRI's Ryan Johnson first place winner in 2017 TmT competition

NHGRI and other institutes at the National Institutes of Health recently participated in a high-energy science communications contest called the Three-Minute Talk (TmT). NHGRI's Ryan Johnson, Ph.D., came away with a first place win after the finals on June 29. Three other postdoctoral intramural trainees from NHGRI - Ralu Nicoli, Cihan Oguz and Anthony Kirilusha - also participated in the finals, taking on the challenge to use plain language and one PowerPoint slide to explain their research in three-minutes or less.




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