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Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

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Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D. defines Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

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Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a laboratory technique for detecting and locating a specific DNA sequence on a chromosome. The technique relies on exposing chromosomes to a small DNA sequence called a probe that has a fluorescent molecule attached to it. The probe sequence binds to its corresponding sequence on the chromosome.

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Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a laboratory technique for detecting and locating a specific DNA sequence on a chromosome. The technique relies on exposing chromosomes to a small DNA sequence called a probe that has a fluorescent molecule attached to it. The probe sequence binds to its corresponding sequence on the chromosome.

Narration Transcription

One method for localizing a piece of DNA within a genome is called fluorescence in situ hybridization, abbreviated FISH. In this approach, a fluorescent dye is attached to a purified piece of DNA, and then that DNA is incubated with the full set of chromosomes from the originating genome, which have been attached to a glass microscope slide. The fluorescently labeled DNA finds its matching segment on one of the chromosomes, where it sticks. By looking at the chromosomes under a microscope, a researcher can find the region where the DNA is bound because of the fluorescent dye attached to it. This information thus reveals the location of that piece of DNA in the starting genome.


Doctor Profile

Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D.

Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D.

Occupation
Director, NHGRI

Biography
Dr. Green's research focuses on three major areas: First, sequencing and comparing targeted stretches of DNA from a wide variety of species en route to unraveling the complexities of genome function; second, developing innovative research tools and technologies for performing genome analysis; and third, identifying and characterizing genes associated with human disease. In his multiple roles as scientific director of NHGRI, chief of the Genome Technology Branch, and director of the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center (NISC), he has fundamental interests in mapping, sequencing, and interpreting vertebrate genomes.

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