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Bold Predictions for Human Genomics by 2030: An NHGRI Seminar Series

Event Details

NHGRI will host a new seminar series this year on the “Bold Predictions for Human Genomics by 2030” that are described in NHGRI’s “Strategic Vision for Improving Human Health at the Forefront of Genomics.” Beginning in February — and coinciding with the 20th anniversary of the publication that reported the draft human genome sequence — this 10-part seminar series is planned to occur roughly each month throughout 2021.

Related Video: The Future of Genomics: 10 Bold Predictions

About the Sessions

For each session, two speakers will use a specific bold prediction as an aspirational theme to discuss their own research and speculate about next decade of genomic advancements. A moderated question and answer session will follow the speakers. The sessions, which will be held via Zoom for the foreseeable future will be open to the public and video recorded for later viewing on the GenomeTV channel of YouTube.

Upcoming

Session 9 - November 1, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Bold Prediction #9: Individuals from ancestrally diverse backgrounds will benefit equitably from advances in human genomics.

Speakers:

Robert Winn, M.D.
Virginia Commonwealth University

Alicia Martin, Ph.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School & Broad Institute

Moderator: 

Chris Gunter, Ph.D.
NHGRI


Session 10 - January 10, 2022, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Bold Prediction #10: Genomic discoveries will lead to curative therapies involving genomic modifications for dozens of genetic diseases.

Speakers:

Timothy Yu, M.D., Ph.D.
Boston Children’s Hospital & Harvard Medical School

John Tisdale, M.D.
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH

Moderator:

Dan Kastner, M.D., Ph.D.
NHGRI

  • Upcoming

    Session 9 - November 1, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Bold Prediction #9: Individuals from ancestrally diverse backgrounds will benefit equitably from advances in human genomics.

    Speakers:

    Robert Winn, M.D.
    Virginia Commonwealth University

    Alicia Martin, Ph.D.
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School & Broad Institute

    Moderator: 

    Chris Gunter, Ph.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 10 - January 10, 2022, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Bold Prediction #10: Genomic discoveries will lead to curative therapies involving genomic modifications for dozens of genetic diseases.

    Speakers:

    Timothy Yu, M.D., Ph.D.
    Boston Children’s Hospital & Harvard Medical School

    John Tisdale, M.D.
    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH

    Moderator:

    Dan Kastner, M.D., Ph.D.
    NHGRI

Past

Session 1 - February 1, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Bold Prediction #1: Generating and analyzing a complete human genome sequence will be routine for any research laboratory, becoming as straightforward as carrying out a DNA purification.

Speakers: 

Evan Eichler, Ph.D.
University of Washington

Karen Miga, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Cruz

Moderator:

Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D.
NHGRI


Session 2 - March 8, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Bold Prediction #2: The biological function(s) of every human gene will be known; for non-coding elements in the human genome, such knowledge will be the rule rather than the exception.

Speakers:

Nancy Cox, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University

Neville Sanjana, Ph.D.
NY Genome Center

Moderator:    

Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D.
NHGRI


Session 3 - April 12, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Bold Prediction #3: The general features of the epigenetic landscape and transcriptional output will be routinely incorporated into predictive models of the impact of genotype on phenotype.

Speakers:       

Tom Gingeras, Ph.D.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Tuuli Lappalainen, Ph.D.
NY Genome Center

Moderator:    

Paul Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
NHGRI


Session 4 - May 25, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Bold Prediction #4: Research in human genomics will have moved beyond population descriptors based on historic social constructs such as race.

Speakers:       

Charmaine Royal, Ph.D.
Duke University

Genevieve Wojcik, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University

Moderator:    

Vence Bonham, Jr., J.D.
NHGRI


Session 5 - June 7, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Bold Prediction #5: Studies involving analyses of genome sequences and associated phenotypic information for millions of human participants will be regularly featured at school science fairs.

Speakers:

Neil Lamb, Ph.D.
HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Chanda Jefferson
Fairfield County School District; Winnsboro, SC

Moderator:    

Lawrence Brody, Ph.D.
NHGRI


Session 6 - July 12, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Bold Prediction #6: The regular use of genomic information will have transitioned from boutique to mainstream in all clinical settings, making genomic testing as routine as complete blood counts (CBCs).

Speakers:

Jennifer Posey, M.D., Ph.D.
Baylor College of Medicine

Katrina Armstrong, M.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School

Moderator:    

Teri Manolio, M.D., Ph.D.
NHGRI


Session 7 - September 16, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Bold Prediction #7: The clinical relevance of all encountered genomic variants will be readily predictable, rendering the diagnostic designation “variant of uncertain significance (VUS)” obsolete.

Speakers:

Heidi Rehm, Ph.D.
Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital

Douglas Fowler, Ph.D.
University of Washington

Moderator:

Ben Solomon, M.D.
NHGRI


Session 8 - October 4, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Bold Prediction #8: A person’s complete genome sequence along with informative annotations can be securely and readily accessible on their smartphone.

Speakers:

Michael Schatz, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University & Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory                     

Gillian Hooker, Ph.D., ScM, LCGC
Concert Genetics

Moderator:

Sarah Bates, M.S.
NHGRI

  • Past

    Session 1 - February 1, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

    Bold Prediction #1: Generating and analyzing a complete human genome sequence will be routine for any research laboratory, becoming as straightforward as carrying out a DNA purification.

    Speakers: 

    Evan Eichler, Ph.D.
    University of Washington

    Karen Miga, Ph.D.
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    Moderator:

    Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 2 - March 8, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

    Bold Prediction #2: The biological function(s) of every human gene will be known; for non-coding elements in the human genome, such knowledge will be the rule rather than the exception.

    Speakers:

    Nancy Cox, Ph.D.
    Vanderbilt University

    Neville Sanjana, Ph.D.
    NY Genome Center

    Moderator:    

    Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 3 - April 12, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

    Bold Prediction #3: The general features of the epigenetic landscape and transcriptional output will be routinely incorporated into predictive models of the impact of genotype on phenotype.

    Speakers:       

    Tom Gingeras, Ph.D.
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Tuuli Lappalainen, Ph.D.
    NY Genome Center

    Moderator:    

    Paul Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 4 - May 25, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

    Bold Prediction #4: Research in human genomics will have moved beyond population descriptors based on historic social constructs such as race.

    Speakers:       

    Charmaine Royal, Ph.D.
    Duke University

    Genevieve Wojcik, Ph.D.
    Johns Hopkins University

    Moderator:    

    Vence Bonham, Jr., J.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 5 - June 7, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

    Bold Prediction #5: Studies involving analyses of genome sequences and associated phenotypic information for millions of human participants will be regularly featured at school science fairs.

    Speakers:

    Neil Lamb, Ph.D.
    HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

    Chanda Jefferson
    Fairfield County School District; Winnsboro, SC

    Moderator:    

    Lawrence Brody, Ph.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 6 - July 12, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Bold Prediction #6: The regular use of genomic information will have transitioned from boutique to mainstream in all clinical settings, making genomic testing as routine as complete blood counts (CBCs).

    Speakers:

    Jennifer Posey, M.D., Ph.D.
    Baylor College of Medicine

    Katrina Armstrong, M.D.
    Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School

    Moderator:    

    Teri Manolio, M.D., Ph.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 7 - September 16, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Bold Prediction #7: The clinical relevance of all encountered genomic variants will be readily predictable, rendering the diagnostic designation “variant of uncertain significance (VUS)” obsolete.

    Speakers:

    Heidi Rehm, Ph.D.
    Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital

    Douglas Fowler, Ph.D.
    University of Washington

    Moderator:

    Ben Solomon, M.D.
    NHGRI


    Session 8 - October 4, 2021, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Bold Prediction #8: A person’s complete genome sequence along with informative annotations can be securely and readily accessible on their smartphone.

    Speakers:

    Michael Schatz, Ph.D.
    Johns Hopkins University & Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory                     

    Gillian Hooker, Ph.D., ScM, LCGC
    Concert Genetics

    Moderator:

    Sarah Bates, M.S.
    NHGRI

Last updated: October 15, 2021