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For Patients and the Public

Health professional with a tablet showing genomic data

Detailed information about genetic disorders, background on genetic and genomic science, pharmacogenomics, family health history tool and online health resources

For Health Professionals


Genetics and genomics information related to patient management, education, NIH and NHGRI research and ethical, legal and social issues


NIH awards $55 million to build million-person precision medicine study

PMI Cohort Program Bethesda, Md., Thurs., July 7, 2016 - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced two draft guidances to support President Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative. The guidances will help provide oversight for tests based on next generation sequencing, a technology that examines a person's DNA to detect medically important differences in genomic make-up that could increase the risk for disease. 

The NIH Family Health History Tool Conference

My Family Health Portrait - A tool from the Surgeon General On June 14 and 15, 2016, NHGRI held the NIH Family Health History Tool Conference, also sponsored by the Genomic Healthcare Branch (GHB) and the Division of Policy, Communications, and Education (DPCE). The overarching goal is "To prepare the FHHT field to improve personal health by responding effectively to rapid changes in Family Health History (FHH) data uses, Health Information Technology (HIT) capabilities, and research opportunities." 

Video: A G2C2 Website Overview This introduction to the Genetics/Genomics Competency Center (G2C2) website at, gives new users an opportunity to view key features of this centralized collection of genomics educational resources for healthcare educators and providers. 

Genomic knowledge is power in the fight against obesity

Read more Although many doctors are wary about discussing weight loss with their overweight patients - for fear of alienating the patients or being ignored - two recent research studies from a team led by NHGRI's Susan Persky, Ph.D., suggest that doctor-patient talks about the genomic underpinnings of obesity can pay off.