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Detailed information about genetic disorders, background on genetic and genomic science, pharmacogenomics, family health history tool and online health resources

For Health Professionals

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Genetics and genomics information related to patient management, education, NIH and NHGRI research and ethical, legal and social issues

Highlights

G2C2 expands genomic resources for health professionals

Healthcare professionals discuss information related to a patient Healthcare professionals now have access to a variety of educational and clinical genomics resources thanks to a new partnership between the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, and several professional medical societies. The Genetics/Genomics Competency Center (G2C2) website has mad available this free, online collection of more than 500 materials for use in the classroom and the clinic.

The Cancer Genome Atlas publishes results for bile duct, uterine and breast cancer

Growing cancer cells are surrounded by healthy cells. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), co-funded by the National Cancer Institute and NHGRI, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular signatures underlying different cancers. Three recent publications from the TCGA network demonstrate how using TCGA's dataset can provide greater insight into preventing, diagnosing and treating specific cancer types. The papers focus on breast, bile duct and uterine cancers and characterize cancer research at a deeper molecular level.

The UDN joins forces with Reddit for an "AMA"

Read more On March 3, 2017, in honor of Rare Disease Day, experts from the Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) turned to Reddit to answer questions from the Reddit community as part of an "Ask Me Anything" (AMA). These rare disease clinical and research experts have joined forces to solve the world's most challenging medical mysteries. Supported by the NIH Common Fund, UDN uses genome sequencing in the clinic, along with a network of experts, to provide answers for patients and families affected by mysterious conditions. Here's a recap of the event.

NIH study reveals how melanoma spreads

MelanomaNewly identified genes and genetic pathways in primary melanoma - a type of skin cancer - could give researchers new targets for developing new personalized treatments for melanoma, and potentially other cancers. Learning how the genes are expressed - turned on or off - could be used in the future to predict how and when the cancer cells will spread to other parts of the body and how fast they will grow. Read the study in the February 6, 2017, online issue of Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research.