Research Funding
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Researchers working at an NHGRI-supported large-scale sequencing center. Courtesy: The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Feature

New training grants prime doctors to tackle genomic medicine

Read more The practice of medicine is expensive and doesn't fit in a one-hour time frame. Tests can only eliminate one diagnosis at a time. Questioning and family history can help a doctor arrive at the correct diagnosis. But even with the information gathered upfront, there are a huge number of tests to consider, and many tests may still be needed. Training doctors to use genomic sequencing is a powerful solution to the challenges today's medical practice. Read more


NIH funds new studies on ethical, legal and social impact of genomic information

Read moreBethesda, Md., Tues., May 17, 2016 - Four new grants from the National Institutes of Health will support research on the ethical, legal and social questions raised by advances in genomics research and the increasing availability of genomic information. The awards will fund researchers at interdisciplinary centers through the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) Centers of Excellence in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications Research (CEER) program. Read more

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Highlights

Mouse models of Zika in pregnancy show how fetuses become infected

 A neMosquitow mouse model of Zika virus infection in pregnancy is offering clues about how the virus works. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis showed that the virus migrated from the pregnant mouse's bloodstream into the placenta, eventually infecting, and causing cell death, in the brains of the unborn pups. Using this mouse model, researchers hope to learn about the virus' biology and develop new vaccines and treatments. The research, co-funded by NHGRI, appears in Cell.
Read the research | Read the press release


Scientists create world's largest catalog of human genomic variation

Read moreAn international team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the world's largest catalog of genomic differences among humans, providing researchers powerful clues to why some people are susceptible to various diseases. Understanding how these differences - called genomic variants - contribute to disease may help clinicians develop improved diagnostics, treatments and prevention methods. The two studies are published online in Nature. Read more


Featured Grants

  • Novel Nucleic Acid Sequencing Technology Development - Direct to Phase II (R44)
    RFA-HG-15-039 [grants.nih.gov]
    Application Due Date(s): August 7, 2016
    Expiration Date: August 8, 2016

Resources


Last Reviewed: June 24, 2016