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NIH

Research at NHGRI

The Division of Intramural Research conducts a broad program of laboratory and clinical research

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An Overview

Division of Intramural Research mission, vision and values
Buildings on NIH Main Campus

Branches

Descriptions for the nine research branches of the Division of Intramural Research
Dan Kastner

Research Investigators

Profiles of NHGRI scientists, their research and current publications
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Clinical Research

NHGRI's clinical research program, the Undiagnosed Diseases Program and current clinical studies

NHGRI Affiliated Centers

Collaborations with other NIH centers involved in genomic research
Letters A-C-T-G

Online Research Resources

Databases, software and research tools developed by NHGRI researchers
Paper Calendar

Intramural Calendar

Intramural research workshops, conferences, seminar series and courses
Books (Hard Copies)

Publications, Books, and Resources

Current publications for intramural research scientists
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Organizational Chart

Organization and personnel for the Division of Intramural Research

Highlights

NIH's new automated toolset detects disease-causing genes in undiagnosed patients

Read moreResearchers with the National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Disease Program have developed a powerful new toolset for finding potential disease-causing gene variants in undiagnosed patients. The work is automatically accomplished by computers - with no human interpretation or bias - and takes about three hours per exome, an individual's protein-coding genes.

Sickle cell disease (SCD) community is hopeful that genome editing will rechart course of the disease

Read moreIn the first study of its kind, NHGRI researchers explored patients', parents' and physicians' perspectives on the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing to reverse sickle cell disease. Study participants expressed overall optimism about participating in human genome editing clinical trials, but were concerned about treatment risks and transparency of the research enterprise, according to the findings published December 24 in Genetics in Medicine.