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Research at NHGRI

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An Overview

Division of Intramural Research mission, vision and values
Buildings on NIH Main Campus

Branches

Descriptions for the nine research branches of the Division of Intramural Research
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Research Investigators

Profiles of NHGRI scientists, their research and current publications
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Clinical Research

NHGRI's clinical research program, the Undiagnosed Diseases Program and current clinical studies

NHGRI Affiliated Centers

Collaborations with other NIH centers involved in genomic research
Letters A-C-T-G

Online Research Resources

Databases, software and research tools developed by NHGRI researchers
Paper Calendar

Intramural Calendar

Intramural research workshops, conferences, seminar series and courses
Books (Hard Copies)

Publications, Books, and Resources

Current publications for intramural research scientists
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Organizational Chart

Organization and personnel for the Division of Intramural Research

Highlights

Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatment 

Chemotherapy Ward Co-presence NetworkCancer patients were a little more likely to survive for five years or more after chemotherapy if they interacted during chemotherapy with other patients who also survived for five years or more, according to a new study by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. The findings were published online July 12, 2017, in the journal Network Science

Study examines microbial rolein childhood eczema 

Child scratching her inner armNHGRI and NCI researchers are probing microbes - bacteria, fungi and viruses - to understand their role in childhood eczema. Using metagenomic sequencing analyses - a powerful sequencing approach that provides insight into microbial biodiversity and function - Julie Segre, Ph.D. (NHGRI), Heidi Kong, M.D., (NCI), and colleagues, pinpointed the presence of unique strains of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with severe eczema and mixed strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis in all individuals. The study was published July 5, 2017, in Science Translational Medicine.

NIH and collaborators identify the genomic cause for Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome 

Myoblast FusionAn international team of researchers has identified the genomic mutations for Carey-Fineman-Ziter (CFZS) syndrome, a very rare, inherited muscle disorder. Their findings provide insight into the development of an embryo's muscles and the regeneration of muscle cells after injury. The study was published today July 6, 2017 in Nature Communications.

NHGRI study highlights role of mitochondria in immune response 

MitochondriaA new study highlights how genomic mutations that cause mitochondrial disease may also compromise affected people's immune response. Based on clinical data from patients with mitochondrial disease, the researchers created a mouse model of mitochondrial disease in T-cells, which play important roles in humans' immune response. The mutations resulted in an increased risk of infections and reduced protective immunity after vaccinations. The study appeared June 6, 2017, in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Community focus is central to American Indians/Alaska Natives in NIH ethics training 

Deana Around Him with her familySince 2014, NIH has offered Institutional Review Board (IRB) training to American Indians and Alaska Natives. Dr. Deana Around Him, a citizen of Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and training participant, learned how NIH ensures the welfare of people who participate in biomedical studies and helped improve the IRB training.