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NIH

Research at NHGRI

The Division of Intramural Research conducts a broad program of laboratory and clinical research

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An Overview

Division of Intramural Research mission, vision and values
Buildings on NIH Main Campus

Branches

Descriptions for the nine research branches of the Division of Intramural Research
Dan Kastner

Research Investigators

Profiles of NHGRI scientists, their research and current publications
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Clinical Research

NHGRI's clinical research program, the Undiagnosed Diseases Program and current clinical studies

NHGRI Affiliated Centers

Collaborations with other NIH centers involved in genomic research
Letters A-C-T-G

Online Research Resources

Databases, software and research tools developed by NHGRI researchers
Paper Calendar

Intramural Calendar

Intramural research workshops, conferences, seminar series and courses
Books (Hard Copies)

Publications, Books, and Resources

Current publications for intramural research scientists
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Organizational Chart

Organization and personnel for the Division of Intramural Research

Highlights

Elevated hormone flags liver problems in mice with methylmalonic acidemia

Read moreNHGRI researchers have discovered a hormone in a mouse study that can be used immediately to can help doctors predict how severely patients with the rare disease methylmalonic acidemia are affected and when to refer them for liver transplants. The findings, published December 6 in JCI Insight, also might shed light on more common disorders such as fatty liver disease, obesity and diabetes.

NHGRI's Dr. Andy Baxevanis named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Andy BaxevanisAndy Baxevanis, Ph.D., a senior scientist leading the Computational Genomics Unit at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Dr. Baxevanis was recognized for his distinguished contributions to the field of comparative genomics, particularly for using computational approaches to study the molecular innovations driving diversity in early animal evolution.

NHGRI joins international team to sequence Mongolian genomes

Mongolian GenomesNorth Asians, including Mongolians and other Siberian ethnic groups, may be more closely related to Eastern and Northern Europeans - including the people of Finland -- than previously thought, according to a new genomics study inĀ Nature Genetics. The international team of researchers, including those from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), made the connection by comparing the whole-genome sequences of 175 ethnic Mongolians to existing genetic variation data.