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NIH

Research at NHGRI

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An Overview

Division of Intramural Research mission, vision and values
Buildings on NIH Main Campus

Branches

Descriptions for the nine research branches of the Division of Intramural Research
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Research Investigators

Profiles of NHGRI scientists, their research and current publications
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Clinical Research

NHGRI's clinical research program, the Undiagnosed Diseases Program and current clinical studies

NHGRI Affiliated Centers

Collaborations with other NIH centers involved in genomic research
Letters A-C-T-G

Online Research Resources

Databases, software and research tools developed by NHGRI researchers
Paper Calendar

Intramural Calendar

Intramural research workshops, conferences, seminar series and courses
Books (Hard Copies)

Publications, Books, and Resources

Current publications for intramural research scientists
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Organizational Chart

Organization and personnel for the Division of Intramural Research

Highlights

UDN releases new funding opportunities

Read More NIH's Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) recently released five funding opportunities that continue research in improving the level of diagnosis and care for patients with undiagnosed diseases. Pending the availability of funds and sufficient applications, the program expects to create a coordinating center, 8-10 clinical sites and 3-6 core laboratories to focus on model organisms, DNA sequencing and metabolomics. To help potential applicants, UDN will hold a an informational webinar Sept. 14th, from 3:00-4:30 p.m. Eastern.

The 2017 Trent Lecture: Bringing Genomics to the Pediatric Oncology Clinic 

Katherine Janeway NHGRI's Division of Intramural Research will present the 13th Jeffrey M. Trent Lecture in Cancer Research Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, at the Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH. Katherine A. Janeway, M.D., MMSc, the clinical director of the Solid Tumor Program at Dana Farber-Boston/Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, will deliver the lecture Bringing Genomics to the Pediatric Oncology Clinic: Diagnosis, Treatment Selection and Rational Clinical Trial Design.

Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatment 

Chemotherapy Ward Co-presence NetworkCancer patients were a little more likely to survive for five years or more after chemotherapy if they interacted during chemotherapy with other patients who also survived for five years or more, according to a new study by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. The findings were published online July 12, 2017, in the journal Network Science

Study examines microbial role in childhood eczema 

Child scratching her inner armNHGRI and NCI researchers are probing microbes - bacteria, fungi and viruses - to understand their role in childhood eczema. Using metagenomic sequencing analyses - a powerful sequencing approach that provides insight into microbial biodiversity and function - Julie Segre, Ph.D. (NHGRI), Heidi Kong, M.D., (NCI), and colleagues, pinpointed the presence of unique strains of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with severe eczema and mixed strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis in all individuals. The study was published July 5, 2017, in Science Translational Medicine.