Current Topics in Genome Analysis

Event Details

to

Lipsett Amphitheater
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (Building 10)

Agenda

Given the rapid advances in genomics and bioinformatics that have taken place in the past few years, an intensive review of the major areas of ongoing genome research would be of great value to our fellow National Institutes of Health (NIH) investigators. To that end, the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) is pleased to once again sponsor the Current Topics in Genome Analysis lecture series.

The series consists of 14 lectures on successive Wednesdays, with a mixture of local and outside speakers covering the major areas of genomics. In this 12th edition of the series, rather than splitting the lectures into "laboratory-based" and "computationally-based" blocks, we have intermingled the lectures by general subject area. We hope that this approach conveys the idea that both laboratory- and computationally-based approaches are necessary in order to do cutting-edge biological research in the future.

The lectures are geared at the level of first year graduate students, are practical in nature, and are intended for a diverse audience. Handouts will be provided for each lecture, and time will be available at the end of each lecture for questions and discussion.

All lectures are held on Wednesday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. in the Lipsett Amphitheater of the NIH Clinical Center (Building 10).

Course Overview

Topics in Genome Analysis 2016

A lecture series covering contemporary areas in genomics and bioinformatics

Videos of the lectures will be available on the GenomeTV channel of YouTube viewing shortly after the live lecture. Lectures will not be Webcast live. View individual 2016 lectures below or view all lectures from the GenomeTV playlist.

Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D.

Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D.

Head Computational Genomics Unit

Eric Green

Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D.

Director National Human Genome Research Institute

Tyra Wolfsberg, Ph.D.

Tyra Wolfsberg, Ph.D.

Associate Director Bioinformatics and Scientific Programming Core

Feb 17

Biological Sequence Analysis I

Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D.

Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D.

Head Computational Genomics Unit

Feb 24

The Genomic Landscape circa 2016

Eric Green

Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D.

Director National Human Genome Research Institute

March 2

Genome-Scale Sequence Analysis

Tyra Wolfsberg, Ph.D.

Tyra Wolfsberg, Ph.D.

Associate Director Bioinformatics and Scientific Programming Core

March 9

Biological Sequence Analysis II

Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D.

Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D.

Head Computational Genomics Unit

March 16

Regulatory and Epigenetic Landscapes of Mammalian Genomes

Laura Elnitski, Ph.D.

Laura Elnitski, Ph.D.

Senior Investigator Translational and Functional Genomics Branch

March 23

Applications of Genomics to Improve Public Health

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Colleen McBride

April 6

Introduction to Population Genetics

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Lynn Jorde

April 13

Identifying the Genomic Basis of Rare Diseases

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David Valle

April 20

Genomic Approaches to the Study of Complex Genetic Diseases

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Karen Mohlke

April 27

Expression Analysis, Functional Enrichment, and Network Inference

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John Quackenbush

May 4

Pharmacogenomics

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Howard McLeod

May 11

Genomic Medicine

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Bruce Korf

May 18

Genomics of Microbes and Microbiomes

Julie Segre, Ph.D.

Julie Segre, Ph.D.

Chief & Senior Investigator Translational and Functional Genomics Branch

May 25

Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies

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Elaine Mardis

Course Mailing List

An automated mailing list has been set up for this course, and we ask all participants to subscribe to this list. The course organizers will be using this mailing list to remind everyone of upcoming lectures, as well as to notify participants of any announcements or changes to the course schedule. Click the link marked "Subscribe or Unsubscribe" and follow the instructions provided on the subsequent page to subscribe. This same URL can be used to leave the mailing list at any time.

Continuing Medical Education (CME) Credits

We are pleased to announce that NHGRI will once again be presenting its "Current Topics in Genome Analysis" lecture series. Given the rapid advances in genomics and bioinformatics that have taken place in the past few years, we feel that an intensive review of the major areas of ongoing genome research would be of great value to our fellow NIH colleagues. A mixture of local and outside speakers will give the lectures designed to cover the major areas of genomics. The lectures are geared at the level of first year graduate students, are practical in nature, and are intended for a diverse audience. Handouts will be provided for each talk, and time will be available at the end of each lecture for questions and discussion.

Who Should Attend

The intended audience includes clinicians, clinical geneticists, social and behavioral scientists, genetic counselors, those involved with genetics and public policy, health educators, and other biomedical and clinical scientists with an interest in genetics, genomics and personalized medicine. No prior expertise on the part of the audience will be required and the lecturers will be instructed to provide any relevant background as part of their lectures.

Objectives

After attending this activity, participants will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Explain the importance of using genomic approaches in modern biomedical research.
  • Interpret case studies involving genome-wide association approaches.
  • Utilize bioinformatics-based approaches with greater facility and confidence, through practice exercises aimed at reinforcing concepts presented during the lectures.
  • Assess, select, and apply genomic and bioinformatic techniques that can help advance their own basic or clinical research programs.
  • Identify potential areas where transdisciplinary approaches involving relevant aspects of genomics and bioinformatics can synergistically promote translational research.
  • Recognize the difference between clinical diagnosis of disease and identification of genetic predisposition to disease.
  • Explain the potential ethical, legal, and social issues related to genetic testing and the recording of genetic information.
Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 21 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Policy on Speaker and Provider Disclosure

It is the policy of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health that the speaker and provider disclose real or apparent conflicts of interest relating to the topics of this educational activity, and also disclose discussions of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s). The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine OCME has established policies in place that will identify and resolve all conflicts of interest prior to this educational activity. Detailed disclosure will be made in the activity handout materials.

You may only claim CME credits for lectures you attended in person in the Lipsett Amphitheater. You may not claim CME credits for watching the archived webcasts.